A HISTORY OF CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY PLACHER PDF

Great Church History resource tool for the classroom, local church context, or personal study. Gives detailed information on key people, dates, and historical circumstances, all of which have had a significant impact on the development of Church History through the ages. I had to read it for a Theology class and found the first 4 chapters extremely boring- I often fell asleep while reading them But after I got over that hurdle I began to read it and understand it better and I was able to keep interested. William C.

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. A History of Christian Theology offers a consice yet complete chronicle of the whole history of Christian theology, from its background in the history of Israel to the various modes of liberation theology in the late 20th century.

This book is an intellectual history, a story of people and their ideas. It will be valuable for college and seminary students as well as lay st A History of Christian Theology offers a consice yet complete chronicle of the whole history of Christian theology, from its background in the history of Israel to the various modes of liberation theology in the late 20th century.

It will be valuable for college and seminary students as well as lay study groups. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about History of Christian Theology , please sign up.

Be the first to ask a question about History of Christian Theology. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Jan 02, Alex Riedel rated it really liked it Shelves: books-i-have. I wonder how much stress Mr. Placher had to deal with in undertaking to write a history of Christian theology in roughly pages.

Such an undertaking, I imagine, would seem impossible without substantial sacrifice of content. My winter break between the autumn and the spring semesters started about two and a half weeks ago, and I have since enjoyed my time off. I opted to read this along with Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities, both being particularly enticing in the midst of all the other bound pie I wonder how much stress Mr.

I opted to read this along with Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities, both being particularly enticing in the midst of all the other bound pieces of paper sitting on my bookshelf in my room. I just finished Dickens' masterpiece a little less than a week ago and I have now finished this one here. I have been consistently thinking about what it is that I am rating my books off of.

I won't go into a huge romantic discussion in this review as I did with A Tale of Two Cities', but I can't just blindly deem a book's "goodness" without some sort of ground. To rate based off how much I agree with its arguments or proposed themes? Based off how well-written it is? Based off its significance or impacts amongst others' work? I don't know the answer to this - and I'll make the rather pseudo-rational turn and just go off my "gut" or "intuition" here and rate based off what pops out to me in reading, which drastically changes from book to book.

For instance, A Tale of Two Cities was enjoyed by me primarily because of its language and precision of description to capture the situations, characters, or events in which it described as well as the content or the narrative of the story as a whole. Another book I've read, Augustine's Confessions, was rated so well because of its honesty, profundity, and faithfulness amongst other things. I will rate this book off of its boldness, its accuracy and, I feel, its inaccuracy at some points , its utterly terrible lack of usage of commas which prima facie threw the meanings of sentences off for me this one is more of a joke , its ability to concisely depict the thought represented, and its unfortunate ability to remain a technical read, oftentimes diminishing the passion and fervor with which so much of the theology talked about in this book was originally written and spoken.

Maybe a little less than a year or so ago, I wrote a review where I stressed my hesitancy to write legitimate reviews of books - not because I would embarrass any of those who read my reviews at any point in time, but because I didn't want to embarrass my future self, where I would, at some point in the future, re-read some of the reviews, shake my head, and say, "That was stupid to say, why'd I say that?

I have been for so long afraid to cling on to a positive stance on so many things because 1 my general attitude to question just about anything and 2 because I didn't want to set in stone via writing anything that I would one day look back upon and disagree with. By the time I die, I wanted to have an oeuvre where I could line up against time and say, "This is from me and I agree with every single part of it. So, I'll just go ahead and suffer the reddened and ashamed face of that feeling one gets when they look back and see that they thought they were completely right but were rather utterly wrong.

This is OK. And so, here's a legitimate review of this book: Placher is an interesting writer in the sense that he doesn't waste technical theological talk, and he manages to add in a few points where I laughed but, please don't get an idea that most others will laugh - my sense of humor is supposedly off and apart from the masses! While reading this book, I found something about myself that I didn't quite expect: I became bored at times.

I doubt that this is from the writing, but it was rather the content. I had reached yet another chapter on the Reformation, this time tracing out how the Reformation played out in England, and I just found it hard to focus.

I got through it, sure, but, if I were to look back at the chapter, I wouldn't remember much of it. Instead of labeling this time period as "boring", I'll rather refrain and say that it'll take an in-depth look to keep me on the edge of my seat. But, despite this, I felt it very beneficial to have read this book. I have seen although crudely where I fit in in the mess and beauty that is Christian theology, and this book made that rather easy for me to figure out by highlighting the main waves of thought in each era.

Patristic thought spawning in the immediate generations after Paul, Peter, John, this lasting until the last century of the first millennium or so; medieval thought, where Plato and Aristotle's philosophical spirits remained alive and were still fighting to the death even a millennium and a third after their time; the Reformation era 1; the Reformation era 2; the Reformation era , etc.

Finally, the supremely interesting stuff: 19th century up to theology just after WWII. This precisely is where I find myself most, eyeing specifically Kierkegaard who, quite frankly, makes me cry, and John Henry Newman, who I have taken quite a liking to after reading this book. I don't know what it is about this period, but they were on to something back then In the pages that I found most interesting, the world around me, i.

In the pages that I sluggishly drove through, my yawns and my lack of energy would run prevalent. In the pages over 19th century theology, I opted to stay up until 3 in the morning. In the pages over Enlightenment theology, I was stuck in a nightmare, dreaming in my sleep about how impatient I became when Charlie repeatedly cried out to me without letting me speak, "The world obviously has a purpose, and, just as a watch has a maker and the clock has a purpose, so does the world, and its maker is God - therefore, this perfect and logically consistent and non-question-begging argument I just said definitively proves God's existence!

Anyways, I have to say here that any introduction to such a terribly expansive area of thought will be brief. This is not an exception. Last year in one of my classes, I was graded on my conciseness on a rather expansive topic. Points were taken away and I was mad. Concision is NOT necessarily an inherently good thing, just like simplicity is NOT necessarily always a virtue thinking about some philosophers of science in saying that The most interesting and captivating thinkers were, unfortunately and not Mr.

Placher's fault, of course , given only a page or two at most. What this book, I believe, then does is that it creates within the reader hopefully still interested in the material by the end of the book an excitement to put it extremely to start an extensive venture into more specific and monumental studies in each of the eras of thought depicted in this book.

Regarding some of its inaccuracy, or, rather, I would say misrepresentation in this case, I certainly wouldn't be the one to speak about any such misrepresentations in Christian theology pre-Reformation, nor would I be the one to say much of anything about the Reformation era up to just around the mids. However, from there, journal articles and books of reading from schoolwork have bashed into my brain some of its various thinkers and their ideas, and the only seemingly "minor" misrepresentation is that this book made it look like Heidegger was not specifically interested in Christianity.

Maybe it is I who am misrepresenting the book, but, despite the fact that Heidegger was given roughly a half a page in this book which arguably makes sense for a Christian theology book , it basically says a couple of things about his indebtedness to existentialism, then exclaims he wasn't a Christian theologian, then period. Sure, that's all true, but no room is given in this book about how central Christianity was to Heidegger or at least this is how I read Heidegger Technically, Mr.

Placher didn't say Christianity wasn't central for him, but his silence gives off a feel for the reader that Christianity existed rather on the circumference of his circle of work. Implicitly, Heidegger's "religion," or "faith," or whatever you want to call it, drove him, more or less, in many ways forward. Anyways, just a pointer OK, I think I'm done now. Until next time Jun 10, Jacob Aitken rated it liked it Shelves: barthian-studies , church-history , historical-theology , medievalism , reference.

I've mixed feelings here. The 3 stars might indicate that I didn't like the book, yet that would not be entirely true. Instead of giving an involved narrative of the book, I'll simply state the pros and cons and leave it at that. Pros: 1. He does a decent job in showing history as a narrative.

Although pedantic, his writing style is remarkably clear Placher was a known prose stylist. Good section on Hebrew theology: The Hebrews' theology arose from the narratives. Occasionally good insight I've mixed feelings here. Occasionally good insights on patristic and medieval theology. Great section on post-Enlightenment theology. Each chapter ends with an annotated bibliography.

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History of Christian Theology: An Introduction

William C. Placher and Derek Nelson compile significant passages written by the most important Christian thinkers, from the early church through the Middle Ages, and up to the beginning of the sixteenth century. Illustrating the major theologians, controversies, and schools of thought, Readings in the History of Christian Theology is an essential companion to the study of church history and historical theology. Excerpts are preceded by the editors' introductions, allowing the book to stand alone as a coherent history. This revised edition expands the work's scope with the addition of many new texts, especially those from the voices of women and others who have been marginalized from the theological tradition.

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William Placher and Derek Nelson compile significant passages written by the most important Christian thinkers, from the Reformers of the sixteenth century through the major participants in the contemporary theological conversation. Illustrating the major theologians, controversies, and schools of thought, Readings in the History of Christian Theology is an essential companion to the study of church history and historical theology. Excerpts are preceded by the editors' introductions, allowing the book to stand alone as a coherent history. This revised edition expands the work's scope, drawing throughout on more female voices and expanding to include the most important twenty-first-century theological contributions. This valuable resource brings together the writings of major theologians from the church's history for a new generation of students. Very informative, learning so much about Christian Theology!

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A modern classic, A History of Christian Theology offers a concise yet complete chronicle of the whole of Christian theology, from its background in the history of Israel to the liberation and postliberal theologies of recent years. This updated thirtieth anniversary includes expanded treatments of theological developments at the end of the twentieth century, and preliminary trajectories for theology in the twenty-first century. It also includes updated bibliographies and revised chapters on important innovations in biblical studies, and their impact on theology. This updated and revised edition will continue to aid the work of both students and faculty for years to come. William C. In slightly more than pages he has chronicled the whole history of Christian theology, from its background in the history of Israel to the various modes of liberation theology in the late 20th century. Moreover, he has touched almost all of the important bases and has dealt with significant figures, issues, movements in an incisive and illuminating manner.

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A modern classic, A History of Christian Theology offers a concise yet complete chronicle of the whole of Christian theology, from its background in the history of Israel to the liberation and postliberal theologies of recent years. This updated thirtieth anniversary includes expanded treatments of theological developments at the end of the twentieth century, and preliminary trajectories for theology in the twenty-first century. It also includes updated bibliographies and revised chapters on important innovations in biblical studies, and their impact on theology. This updated and revised edition will continue to aid the work of both students and faculty for years to come. William C. In slightly more than pages he has chronicled the whole history of Christian theology, from its background in the history of Israel to the various modes of liberation theology in the late 20th century.

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