CRATAEVA RELIGIOSA - PDF

Etymology Crateva derives from Crataevus, a Greek botanist in Hippocrates time; religiosa indicates growth near places of worship. Botany Salingbobog is a moderate-sized, spreading, unarmed, deciduous tree growing to a height of 15 meters. Bark is gray, the wood yellowish-white, turning light brown when old. Leaves are clustered at the ends of the branchlets, with a common petiole 5 to 10 centimeters long, at the summit of which are three leaflets. Leaflets are ovate-lanceolate or ovate, 7. Flowers occur in terminal corymbs, about 5 centimeters in diameter, greenish-yellow, and at length, purplish.

Author:Dounris Shakagal
Country:Egypt
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Spiritual
Published (Last):4 January 2005
Pages:155
PDF File Size:16.38 Mb
ePub File Size:8.89 Mb
ISBN:317-2-37203-265-6
Downloads:1436
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Kagrel



Etymology Crateva derives from Crataevus, a Greek botanist in Hippocrates time; religiosa indicates growth near places of worship. Botany Salingbobog is a moderate-sized, spreading, unarmed, deciduous tree growing to a height of 15 meters. Bark is gray, the wood yellowish-white, turning light brown when old.

Leaves are clustered at the ends of the branchlets, with a common petiole 5 to 10 centimeters long, at the summit of which are three leaflets. Leaflets are ovate-lanceolate or ovate, 7. Flowers occur in terminal corymbs, about 5 centimeters in diameter, greenish-yellow, and at length, purplish.

Petals are ovate or oblong, with the claw half as long as the limb. Fruit is ovoid or rounded, 3 to 5 centimeters in diameter, with a hard and rough rind. Seeds are about 10 centimeters in length, numerous, kidney-shaped, and embedded in a yellow pulp.

Distribution - In waste places, along streams and in thickets near the sea from northern Luzon to Masbate and Palawan, probably also in Mindanao and the Sulu Archipelago. Constituents - Contains a principle similar to saponin. Bark has yielded a triterpene, diosgenin and two alkaloids, cadabicine and cadabcine diacetate. Leaves yielded isovitexin, proanthocyanidins, myricetin and phenolic acids, p-hydroxyl benzoic acid, vanilic acid, ferulic acid and sinapic acid.

Fruits have yielded pentadecane, octanamide, tricosanonoe and friedelin. Both showed absence of saponins.

Properties - Bark has a disagreeable smell, the taste slightly bitter, biting and pungent. Parts used Leaves, bark, roots. Uses Edibility - Berry like fruits are edible and used as astringent.

Folkloric - In the Philippines , leaves used for irregular menstruation. Also, considered stomachic. Root employed as alterative. Bark of fresh root used for the same purpose.

Cytotoxic triterpenes were identified from the seeds of C religiosa. Phytochemical screening yielded alkaloids, carbohydrates, tannins, flavonoids, resins, proteins, oils, steroids, and terpenoids.

Lupeol linolate found better compared to lupeol and indomethacin. The apical bark was more effective than the middle bark and mature bark in inhibiting the growth of all bacteria. Extracts showed dose-dependent decrease in paw edema in the carrageenan model. The alcoholic extract showed more profound effect that aqueous extracts correlating with flavonoid and triterpenoid content. All extracts were effective against the tested organisms.

The EAE showed more potency against some of the tested bacteria. The nanoparticles were investigated for antibacterial activity against gram negative and gram positive bacteria.

Results showed good antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria. Arthritis was induced by injecting CFA below the plantar aponeurosis of the right hind paw. Results showed antimicrobial activity which were comparable to standard drugs. Results showed a chloroform extracts gave better mortality rate. The insect C. Extracts showed moderate antitrypanosomal activity MIC All three extracts showed significant activity against the bacterial strains, while the chloroform extract was inactive against fungal strains.

GC-MS analysis of normal and galled flower of C. Stress conditions produced large number of fatty acids and secondary metabolites, with the flower gall showed higher unsaturated fatty acid content than normal flower extract. Fatty acids, oleic acid and palmitic acid, were higher in the flower gall than normal flower, and myristic acid was detected only in the gall extract. Availability Wild-crafted. I Aug. Res J Pharm.

App Sci. Wagay, N. Khan, S. Stuart Jr. Potential Herbal Medicines and Drug Interactions. Alternative Medicine Dictionary. Plant Names. Common names. Capparis magna Lour. Crateva religiosa G. The Plant List. Other vernacular names. Copying and pasting the information on the search window or using the DOI if available will often redirect to the new link page.

TDA7231 PDF

Antimycotic Potential of Crataeva Religiosa Hook and Forst Against Some Selected Fungal Pathogens

Crataeva religiosa Hook and Forst belonging to family Capparidaceae Cappaceae was selected based on its ethnopharmacological uses like diuretic, laxative, lithonotriptic, antirheumatic, antiperiodic, bitter tonic, rubifacient and counterirritant and was investigated to evaluate in vitro antimycotic potential of petroleum ether, chloroform, ethanolic and aqueous extracts against Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Cryptococcus marinus and Aspergillus niger by disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of C. The ethanolic extract significantly inhibits the growth of selected fungal pathogens, whereas aqueous extract do not show zone of inhibition against the tested Candida species. The results indicate the possible therapeutic uses of the plant as a potent antifungal agent. This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features!

BS EN 1744-1 PDF

Article Information

Crateva religiosa , the sacred garlic pear or temple plant , is a species of flowering tree. It is a member of the capers family. The tree is sometimes called the spider tree because the showy flowers bear long, spidery stamens. It is grown elsewhere for fruit, especially in parts of the African continent.

BIRELI LAGRENE TABS PDF

Crateva religiosa

Crateva religiosa G. Capparaceae As understood here, this species is confined to Asia, but bears very close affinity to the African species Crateva adansonii, with which it has been equated by some authorities[ Title The Useful Plants of West Tropical Africa. Publisher Royal Botanic Gardens; Kew. If you have any useful information about this plant, please leave a comment. Comments have to be approved before they are shown here. If you would like to support this site, please consider Donating.

HORIA TECUCEANU PDF

.

Related Articles